Difference in Muscle Quality over the Adult Life Span and Biological Correlates in the Baltimore Longitudinal Study of Aging.

TitleDifference in Muscle Quality over the Adult Life Span and Biological Correlates in the Baltimore Longitudinal Study of Aging.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2014
AuthorsMoore AZenobia, Caturegli G, E Metter J, Makrogiannis S, Resnick SM, Harris TB, Ferrucci L
JournalJ Am Geriatr Soc
Volume62
Issue2
Start Page230
Pagination230-236
Date Published02/2014
ISSN1532-5415
Abstract

OBJECTIVES: To examine differences in a proxy measure of muscle quality across the adult life span and explore potential mechanisms of muscle quality change through identification of cross-sectional correlates of muscle quality.DESIGN: Cross-sectional study.SETTING: Baltimore Longitudinal Study of Aging.PARTICIPANTS: Seven hundred eighty-six individuals with a mean age of 66.3 (range 26-96) (N = 786). A sensitivity analysis was conducted in a subset of participants matched according to sex, muscle mass, and body size.MEASUREMENTS: Muscle quality was operationalized as the ratio of knee-extension strength (isokinetic dynamometry) to thigh muscle cross-sectional area (computed tomography). Differences in muscle strength, muscle area, and muscle quality ratio with age were evaluated, and the association between the muscle quality ratio and measures reflecting domains of cognitive function, motor control, peripheral nerve function, adiposity, glucose homeostasis, and inflammation were assessed through multivariate regression analyses.RESULTS: A linear relationship between age and muscle quality ratio was observed, suggesting a gradual decline in muscle quality over the adult life course. Associations were observed between muscle quality ratio and measures of adiposity, as well as peroneal nerve motor conduction velocity, finger tapping speed, and memory performance (P < .01). The association between muscle quality ratio and nerve conduction velocity was maintained after adjustment for anthropometric measurements (P < .05).CONCLUSION: Muscle quality declines progressively with age over the adult life span and is affected by obesity and neurological factors. Studies are needed to clarify the mechanisms of these associations and their implications for functional outcomes.

DOI10.1111/jgs.12653
Alternate JournalJ Am Geriatr Soc
PubMed ID24438020